chapter  3
31 Pages

THE CONFLICT OF OPINION ON NATIONAL EDUCATION

Horace, Sat. i, 9, 59. IT APPEARED to many men that a new era in English education had begun in 1846. 1 But the new era brought with it greatly increased governmental grants to the educational societies. And from this fact the Minutes proved fruitful not merely of educational progress, but also of a less auspicious future of intensified party rivalries and increasingly embittered sectarian strife. Richard Cobden thought in 1848 that education was the main cause of the split in his own party. 2 For there was at stake a double issue about which there was as little concord in educational circles as there was agreement on any matter in the confused parliamentary politics of the time.