chapter  13
CIVILITY, BARBARISM, AND APHRA BEHN'S THE WIDOW RANTER
Pages 16

As one of the small but growing number of scholars of color engaged in the study of Renaissance English culture and colonialism, I am heartened by the current attention being paid to early modern European racialism and racism. Yet implicit in Wayne's comment cited above is an uncomplicated assumption about what "race" means in the early modern period. Intrinsic to this type of reasoning is a perception that early modern English people equated "race" with color in the same way that citizens of the United States currently do. In this presumption, "race" is used as if it were a universal paradigm rather than a mediated social practice.