chapter
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The phenomenology of the levels of knowledge

In describing the relation of significant intention to fulfilling intuition we began with the verbal expression of a percept, and said that the intentional essence of the intuitive act fitted in with, or belonged to, the semantic essence of the significative act. This is plainly so in every case of total identification, where acts of like quality, i.e. both assertive or both unassertive, are synthetically unified; where the acts are of unlike quality, the identification is solely based on their materials. This carries over, mutatis mutandis, to cases of partial identification, so that we may hold that the material or matter is the aspect of the character of each act which comes up for synthesis, that is essential for identification (and naturally also for distinction).