chapter
18 Pages

[6]. More than Wriggling Your Wrist (or Your Mouse): Thinking, Seeing, and Drawing: Laurie Olin

I love to draw. I have drawn as long as I can remember.

I draw more than a lot of people, even in my profession.

I draw because I like to. I draw to learn. Why? Because

drawing is a way of thinking while acting, or of thinking

through acting. It really isn’t a parlor trick, or some low

intensity athletic activity, or a wriggling of the wrist. Drawing

is about seeing and visualizing. It’s about memory and

finding a sequence of marks that engage observation

and thought. In the act of drawing a lot happens in a very

short period of time, often almost instantaneously. Watching

a person draw is like watching an internal combustion

engine power an automobile. You can’t see the inner work-

ings, the fire and explosions, the air sucking and fluids

circulating, the movement of the parts. All you see are

the wheels turning and the pencil moving on the page.