chapter  7
20 Pages

BLENDING GENDERS: CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE EMERGING FIELD OF TRANSGENDER STUDIES

When we both (independently) began research in this area in the latter half of the 19705, the te rm "gender dysphoria" had been in use fo r some time. In the United Kingdom, however, transstx ualism and transvestism wefe in morc common usc. Evell now, morc than 20 years on, transvestism and transsexualism have not been expunged from the literature (Bockting & Coleman, 1992b). The history of these terms and their conceptions has now been fairl y well documented (King, 1981, 1993),

At the time of the Second World War, " transvestism" had become the preferred term and was used, across the literature, broadly enough to encompass those wishing to change sex through to the "automonosexual" fetishistic cross-dresser. With the wider availability of sex-reassignment procedures in the 19505 and 19605, a term was req uired to specify those "transvestites" who wished fo r and were sui table for such procedures. In such cases, Benjamin's " transsexual" became the preferred tCrm. 1t was nOt until the late 1960s that the terms "transvestite" and "transsexual" and their differentiation became standard throughout the literature.