chapter  10
40 Pages

Liberty

The lesson, he conceded, might seem unnecessary in a period ‘decidedly favourable to the development of new opinions’. But he thought his time a time of transition, with the openness of such times. New orthodoxies would come to dominate social opinion, the more surely in a democratic and equal state. It is then that the teachings of the Liberty will have their greatest value’.2