chapter
26 Pages

Introduction

ByHarriet Hawkins

Cultural geographers have long taken the diverse creative practices of others (from painters, to poets, musicians, and film-makers) as their subject. On the one hand, are geographers for whom geography-arts relations require further critical attention, either because they have reached somewhat of a still point, stuck in a hiatus of criticality, or because their cult-like status has foreclosed more critical discussions. On the other hand, is a seemingly parallel sense from within creative practice-based research – from fields as diverse as creative writing, drama, design, and visual art – that much needed critical discussion is often shut down. Importantly, Geography as a discipline is not alone in this creative turn, indeed, we see similar work emerging in anthropology, archaeology, sociology, politics, and international relations as well as history. Importantly, Geography as a discipline is not alone in this creative turn, indeed, we see similar work emerging in anthropology, archaeology, sociology, politics, and international relations as well as history.