chapter  8
Socioeconomic Change and Demographic Response: Philippine Population Processes in the 70s
WithRobert A. Hackenberg, Henry F. Magalit
Pages 44

Socioeconomic characteristics, other than household type, proved to be rather ineffectual in adding predictive power to the multiple regression. Economic planners wanted results much more rapidly than could be expected from a proposal to correlate population decline with socioeconomic benefits. The literature on the population of the Philippines is replete with technical reports on fertility surveys. The early 1970s saw a population control effort in the Philippines based on the assumption that it must be preceded or accompanied by rapid development; it was designated the Total Integrated Development Approach. Economic planners wanted results much more rapidly than could be expected from a proposal to correlate population decline with socioeconomic benefits. The population program must succeed by recruiting users of effective methods in rural areas with low levels of development. The specific prescription indicated for the Philippine population problem, then, is intensified economic development efforts in the lagging regions: Western Visayas and Northern Mindanao.