chapter  1
Overview of Recent Developments for Interval-Censored Data
Pages 26

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The literature on failure time data analysis has been growing fast and this

is especially the case in recent years for interval-censored failure time data, a

type of failure time data that often occurs in clinical trials and longitudinal

studies with periodic follow-ups, among others (Finkelstein (1986); Kalbfleisch

and Prentice (2002); Sun (2006)). In these situations, an individual due for

4 Interval-Censored Time-to-Event Data: Methods and Applications

the prescheduled observations for a clinically observable change in disease or

health status may miss some observations and return with a changed status.

Accordingly, we only know that the true event time is greater than the last

observation time at which the change has not occurred and less than or equal to

the first observation time at which the change has been observed to occur, thus

giving an interval that contains the real (but unobserved) time of occurrence

of the change. The well-studied right-censored failure time data are a special

case of interval-censored data.