chapter  8
8 Pages

In’ammatory Cell Electrotaxis

Wounding initiates a robust in’ammatory response that is essential to prevent infection. Within minutes of wounding, neutrophils arrive at a wound site to remove any bacteria and other foreign microorganisms from the wound site. Neutrophils are replaced by macrophages around three days postwounding to clear the wound of matrix and cell debris. T cells and mast cells are also recruited to wounds, but slightly later, between seven and ten days postwounding. In addition to their anti-infective, phagocyte, and immune surveillance roles, all in’ammatory cells release large amounts of growth factors and cytokines that can amplify the in’ammatory response and also recruit and activate other cell types in the wound environment. While embryos can regenerate damaged tissue perfectly, adult skin wounds always heal with a scar, and we now know that the robust

Introduction ....................................................................................................... 177 Galvanotaxis.......................................................................................................178 Leukocyte Electrotaxis .......................................................................................178 T Cell Electrotaxis ............................................................................................ 179 T Cell Electrotaxis In Vivo .................................................................................181 Murine Neutrophil Electrotaxis .........................................................................181 Macrophage and Polymorphonuclear Cell Electrotaxis ....................................181 Conclusions ....................................................................................................... 182 References ......................................................................................................... 182

in’ammatory response is partly responsible for wound šbrosis and scarring. In addition, persistent in’ammation is often seen in chronic wounds, contributing to their inability to heal. Understanding how in’ammatory cells are guided to the wound and how in’ammation is curtailed is therefore paramount in our efforts to dampen wound in’ammation, heal chronic wounds, and reduce scarring.