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54 Pages

A Letter to the Right Honourable Edmund Burke

ByJanet Todd, Marilyn Butler, Emma Rees-Mogg

The civilization which has taken place in Europe has been very partial, and, like every custom that an arbitrary point of honour has established, refines the manners at the expence of morals, by making sentiments and opinions current in conversation that have no root in the heart, or weight in the cooler resolves of the mind. —And what has stopped its progress?—/hereditary property—hereditary honours. In the infancy of society, confining our view to our own country, customs were established by the lawless power of an ambitious individual; or a weak prince was obliged to comply with every demand of the licentious barbarous insurgents, who disputed his authority with irrefragable arguments at the point of their swords; or the more specious requests / of the Parliament, who only allowed him conditional supplies.