chapter
7 Pages

Introduction

ByJanet Todd, Marilyn Butler, Emma Rees-Mogg

This chapter first considers women in the grand light of human creatures, who, in common with men, are placed on this earth to unfold their faculties; and afterwards it particularly points out their peculiar designation. The conduct and manners of women, in fact, evidently prove that their minds are not in a healthy state; for, like the flowers which are planted in too rich a soil, strength and usefulness are sacrificed to beauty; and the flaunting leaves, after having pleased a fastidious eye, fade, disregarded on the stalk, long before the season when they ought to have arrived at maturity. Many individuals have more sense than their male relatives; and, as nothing preponderates where there is a constant struggle for an equilibrium, without it has naturally more gravity, some women govern their husbands without degrading themselves, because intellect will always govern.