chapter  Chapter Three
23 Pages

Religion, Dream, And Delirium

ByCarlos Domínguez-Morano

Delirium and hallucination have enjoyed wide space in religion, in spite of the limits which religious institutions have tended to impose. The relationship between religion and dreams, however, takes some time to appear and is never explored with the same explicit clarity. A. Freud is firmly convinced that in the essence of religion there is something that dynamically opposes, in the manner of a resistance, a complete psychoanalytical investigation and practice. In the ethical sphere, the interweaving with religion is even more intense than with other aspects of culture, partly because science, on principle, renounces intervention. In the ethical sphere, the interweaving with religion is even more intense than with other aspects of culture, partly because science, on principle, renounces intervention. Confession has never achieved the suppression of neurotic symptoms; furthermore, the sacrament has constituted a fundamen-tal instrument of control and ecclesial command of the conscience.