chapter  IV
38 Pages

HUSBANDRY OF THE MATERIALS OF NATIVE MANUFACTURES AND ARTS

This chapter explores the cotton plant, next to rice, and the most valuable article of the agriculture of the Indian islanders. The common cotton of Java is either grown in upland soils or as a green crop in the dry season, in succession to rice. The great inconvenience of the varieties of cotton grown in the Indian islands arises from the quantity of seed they contain, and the obstinacy with which the wool adheres to it. Indigo, in Java, is either raised as a second crop after rice in low lands, or in upland soils, as the principal crop; in both cases, it is reared without the assistance of dressings of any sort. The variety raised, according to the first description of husbandry, is the smaller one, or that which takes the shortest time to come to maturity, and that, according to the second, the larger, or that which takes the longest time.