chapter  XXVII
4 Pages

TODD'S GENERALIZATIONS AS TO THE RESERVE POWERS OF DISMISSAL AND DISSOLUTION

T HE historical importance of Todd's conclusions as to the constitutional position of a Colonial Governor is great. His work has played an important role in the development of colonial self-government. From the particular instances which he cites, it is not easy to make any very definite generalizations. But Todd boldly generalized as to the constitutional practice, and his propositions require some attention. They may be stated as follows:

I. Although Ministers possess the confidence of the popular Chamber, the Governor may decline to act upon their advice

almost completely destroy the reality of self-government in a Dominion or Colony. For it would enable the Governor to decline to act upon advice merely because, inter alia, he attributes unworthy motives to those Ministers who hold office. It is clear that no self-respecting Ministers could accept office if such a condition of affairs were to obtain.