chapter
20 Pages

Citation, Metaphor, and Listening Time

The would-be analyst may well make disturbing discoveries about what seems a bewildering choice of present systems: approaches of which, in the words of Paul Bove, each "provides a cure for a disease which is invented only so that the cure can be effective" (Bove 1975, p. 6); the effect of the establishment of the critic in the role of theorist;1 and the tendency of much critical writing toward clotted style and arcane vocabulary.2 One becomes no longer surprised at the paucity of satisfactorily applicable critical models capable of dealing with some part of an ever-expanding canon of creative results: music, as an example, which has escaped from, or defied, convincing analysis,3 or work which, through indeterminacy and improvisation, realizes process in composition and/or execution rather than elaborating a fixed narrative dramatism.