chapter  VI
41 Pages

CONCLUSION

CoNGRESSalwaysmakeswhathasteitcanto legislate.Itistheprimeobjectofitsrulesto expeditelaw-making.Itscustomsarefruits ofitscharacteristicdiligenceinenactment.Be thematterssmallorgreat,frivolousorgrave, whichbusyit,itsaimistohavelawsalways a-making.Itstemperisstrenuouslylegislative. Thatitcannotregulateallthequestionsto whichitsattentionisweeklyinvitedisitsmisfortune,notitsfault;isduetothehumanlimitationofitsfaculties,nottoanynarrowcircumscriptionofitsdesires.I£itscommittee machineryisinadequatetothetaskofbringing toactionmorethanoneoutofeveryhundredof thebillsintroduced,itisnotbecausethequick clearanceofthedocketisnotthemotiveofits

CONCLUSION. 295 organic life. If legislation, therefore, were the only or the chief object for which it should live, it would not be possible to withhold admiration from those clever hurrying rules and those inexorable customs which seek to facilitate it. Nothing but a doubt as to whether or not Congress should confine itsel£ to law-making can challenge with a question the utility of its organization as a facile statute-devising machine.