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•POEMS.

T o dare be good, though a whole Age fnould frown; T o live within, and from that even ftate See all the under-world ftoop to its fate; T o give the Law of Honour, and difpence All that is handfome, great and worthy thence ; Are things at once your praöicc and your end, And which I dare admire, but not commend. But fince t’oblige the world is your delight, You mnft defcend within our reach and fight: For fo Divinity m'uft take difguife, Left Mortals perifh with the bright fnrprife. And thus your Mufe (which can enough reward All aftions {he vouchfafes but to regard, And Honours gives, than Kings more permanent, Above the reach o f A&s o f Parliament J May fufteran acknowledgment from me, For having thence receiv’d Eternity. My thoughts with fuch advantage you cxprefi,

F I

I hardly know-them in this Charming drefs. And had I moreunkindnefB frommy friend Than my demerits ere cm^d apprehend, Were the Fleet courted with this gale o f wind, I might be fure a rich return to find. So when the shepherd o f his Nymph complain'd, Apollo in his fhapc his Miftrefs gain'd : She might havefcorrt’d the Swain, Sc found excufe; But could not his great Oratour refufe. But for Rofanias Intcreft I fhould fear It would be hard t’obtain your pardon here. Bnt your firft Goodncfs will, I know, allow That what was Bounty then, is Mercy now. Forgivenefs is the nobleft Chatity, And nothing can worthy your favour be. For you (God-like) arc fo much your own fate, That what you will accept you miift create.