chapter  9
18 Pages

Theodora A. Jankowski (1991), 'The Subversion of Flattery: The Queen's Body in John Lyly's Sapho and Phao', Medieval & Renaissance Drama in England, 5, pp. 69–86.

Oh, which way shall I lye? what shall I doe? ... Ahl impacient disease of loue, and Goddesse ofloue thrise vnpitifull. The Eagle is neuer stricken with thunder, nor the Olyue with lightning, and maye great Ladies be plagued with loue? 0 Venus, haue I not strawed thine Altars with sweete roses? kepte thy swannes in cleare ryuers? fead thy sparrowes with ripe come, & harboured thy doues in faire houses? . . . Didst thou nourse me in my swadling clouts with wholsome hearbes, that I might perish in my flowring yeares by fancie? (1-2; 77-78; 83-88; 90-92)

70 MEDIEVAL & RENAISSANCE DRAMA IN ENGLAND

72 MEDIEVAL & RENAISSANCE DRAMA IN ENGLAND

74 MEDIEVAL & RENAISSANCE DRAMA IN ENGLAND

The Subversion of Flattery 75

78 MEDIEVAL & RENAISSANCE DRAMA IN ENGLAND

80 MEDIEVAL & RENAISSANCE DRAMA IN ENGLAND

84 MEDIEVAL & RENAISSANCE DRAMA IN ENGLAND

diplomatie!" (p. 191 ). Hunter asserts that "Lyly's Sapho can only be a conqueror and a ruler" (p. 168) and the play ends with her in command of herself (p. 173). He also remarks that Lyly "has here made his monarch a lady, and therefore one whose power must express itself in the field of love rather than that of war" (p. 16 7).