chapter  XV
10 Pages

GILBERT AND LOCAL ACTS

WHEN the stormy career of the Poor Law Commisi:lioners had come to an end we enter on quieter times. If the opposition to the law was in some respects louder and more violent, it was less formidable. It allied itself with chartism and the revolutionary propaganda. The orderly section of the public was alarmed, and the maintenance of the law was assured. The period 1848-71 was largely concerned in developing some aspects of reform which had been imperfectly dealt with in the Act of 1834.