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SECT IO N II— U T IL IZ A T IO N AND DEVELOPMENT OFLAND RESOURCES
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On balance, assuming no unpredictable great catastrophe, the question does not seem to be “ Shall we have enough food by 19 7 5 ? ” but rather, “ How shall we produce the needed food and fiber efficiently; how produce it at low cost?” W e can produce more at increasing cost as needed, but, unless we offset that in-

search Service, U S D A ) : I f we take 19 50 as a base year and project our 19 75 needs in terms of population increase, per capita con­ sumption, and gradual growth in level of ex­ ports and imports, those needs seem likely to come within a range of 40 to 50 percent in­ crease from 19 50 . I am optimistic about the physical possibilities of achieving an increase well within that range, but it will not come automatically. Projecting such increases with confidence assumes adequate attention to re­ search, education, conservation, and other pro­ grams undertaken on a balanced basis. More land is available if we need the land, but most of this increase is likely to come from higher production per acre and per animal.