chapter  4
18 Pages

5 + 3 = 8: The Eight Barriers to Access and Equity in the Creative Classroom

In Chapter 3 we explored the five crises of creativity that have come about as a result of our traditional, individual-based orientation towards creativity that permeates throughout the educational sphere. This individual-based orientation towards creativity emanates from an individualistic culture that grants author function to sole actors for cultural occurrences that are socially situated. These five crises in creativity present challenges to educators in the creative classroom, not only because they are misaligned with theory and practice and distort the realities of the creative process, but also because they impede access and equity in the creative classroom. Beyond these five crises of creativity that derive from an individual-based orientation towards invention and innovation, in this chapter I identify three additional crises of creativity in education that are based less on our culture of individualism, but more on our cultures of power. As will be discussed below, these two cultural forces are not mutually exclusive, and indeed many intersections between the two forces exist. Combined together, the five crises of creativity in education derived from a culture of individualism plus the three crises of creativity in education derived from a culture of power amount to what I describe at the end of this chapter as the eight barriers to access and equity in the creative classroom.