chapter  7
29 Pages

Subject Disciplines as the Opportunity for Group Action: A Measured Critique of Subject Sub-cultures

The idea of subject disciplines as an historical reification of knowledge; as perspectives that limit but unite groups of initiates because they share

the habituated thought forms through which individual reality is constructed; in other words, they become part of the taken for granted stock of knowledge. As Schutz suggests, 'this consists of a set of systems of relevant typifications, of typical solutions for practical and theoretical problems, of typical precepts for typical behaviour. All this knowledge is taken for granted by the respective social group and is thus socially-approved knowledge'. (Esland, 1971)

. . . has been expressed in various terminologies and in increasing frequency over the last ten years.