chapter  56
6 Pages

A case study of coach practices in skill acquisition training

WithJ. F. BARKELL AND D. O’CONNOR 355

Higher levels of contextual interference and variability in practice require the athlete to perform a number of motor skills in a myriad of scenarios so that they cannot generate a series of skill based steps to improve at the one skill. The athletes mind is required to constantly move from one skill to another in no particular order, similar to that of a game. Whilst this form of training increases errors in practice it does develop the cognitive skills of the athlete due to the involvement of decision making, higher levels of concentration, and the ability to refocus on a previously learned task (Porter and Magill, 2010; Robinson, 2010).