chapter  17
16 Pages

Conclusions and implications for theory and practice: from reports of Brazilian, Canadian, Chinese, English, Filipino, Greek, Indian, Ethiopian-immigrant-Israeli, mainstream Jewish-Israeli, Japanese, Russian, American and Venezuelan youth

From reports of Brazilian, Canadian, Chinese, English, Filipino, Greek, Indian, Ethiopian-immigrant-Israeli, mainstream Jewish-Israeli, Japanese,
ByJ. GIBSON-CLINE WITH L. MARTINSON, B. SHAW

Modern epistemology asserts there is no one truth but only multiple discourses of truth. This position reflects an important change in thinking from the belief systems of our forebears and affects all our decision-making regarding issues varying from how we perceive the universe to how we conduct our personal lives. The modern civilization that faces us at the beginning of the twenty-first century has brought a multitude of changes to our economic, political, technological and social worlds, and together with these changes, a host of new requirements for successful management of our lives. The findings of the many studies in this book suggest that the most important of these may be the requirement to make – or be prepared to make – continual modifications of our behaviour, goals and life patterns to meet whatever changes are to come.