chapter  9
Creative and Media Diploma: Jon Wardle and Emma Walters
ByJON WARDLE, EMMA WALTERS
Pages 14

In 1985 Routledge published Teaching the Media by Len Masterman. He identified many of the key issues in media education and offered a blueprint upon which subsequent important contributors such as Buckingham (2003), Burn (2007), Gauntlett (2007), Jenkins (2008) and McDougall (2006) built a more nuanced understanding of, and rationale for, subject discipline. There have been moments of agreement: the introduction of A level Media Studies legitimized the work of the secondary media teacher (now more students do A level Media Studies than Physics); and times of disagreement – the value of sector-related so-called ‘vocational’ courses. Such diverse views are articulated more comprehensively in McDougall (2006). However, a quarter of a century on it is clear that there is a broad consensus in the theoretical framework for Media Studies that:

• media representations are not reality; • the media are produced by organizations and individuals and therefore can and should

be read critically; • the media are now not only received, but also reinterpreted by audiences.