chapter  2
INTEREST GROUP CONFLICTS IN A REFORMING ECONOMY
ByChristopher Findlay and ]tang Shu
Pages 22

Further reform in China depends on the political consequences of the reforms to date. Ten years ago, when economists debated the nature of the relationship between the planned economy and market economy, nobody expected that the planning system might be so deeply affected by the emergence of the market. At the same time, the reforms have promoted new types of economic relationships between people. These have in turn changed the politics of the next stages of reform. Rapid economic growth has generated both new shared interests among social groups and new conflicts of interest. Social groups with common or opposing economic interests clearly existed before 1978, but the kind of interest group interaction now observed is new to contemporary China.