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What Is to Be Done? I do not intend to suggest here that the disciplinary class is a kind of shangri-la, where all learn to write naturally and effortlessly. Students do not all learn to write in those classes, and many of those who do not could be helped by those of us who have been thinking, in a more focused way, about the issue of writing and its teaching. Here I would like to draw on yet more research: research that has demonstrated how, in the workplace, strategies for teaching writing (although hardly defined in those terms by their teachers) are in place that are reminiscent of some of what we do and do well in the composition class. Specifically, research conducted at Carleton University and McGill University, comparing the composing of university disciplinary writing with the composing of workplace writing, has demonstrated the degree to which there is collaborative shaping and reshaping of initial drafts by old-timers in the workplace. The mode is very much that of the apprentice and the old-timer working together over work in progress. It is precisely this kind of intervention during the process that we, as writing teachers, do so well, and that there seems to be so little time for in the disciplinary class.