chapter  1
10 Pages

Introduction

ByTRICIA BERTRAM GALLANT AND LESTER F. GOODCHILD

It should not be a surprise that many are concerned about the ethicality of the academy and the integrity of higher education in America and around the world. A quick review of two of the most prominent higher education press publications in the United States, Inside Higher Education and The Chronicle of Higher Education, reveal numerous stories of unethical conduct on the part of professors, administrators, researchers, and students (e.g., Brainard 2008; Brazao 2008; Jaschik 2008; Lederman 2008; Mills 2008; Monastersky 2006; Neelakantan 2008; Overland 2008; Wong 2010; Young 2007). Headlines such as “Science Journals Must Develop Stronger Safeguards against Fraud” or “Cheating Incident Involving 34 Students at Duke Is Business School’s Biggest Ever” should cause us to pause. Are there many people behaving badly in the academy? And, if there are, are we heading down a road of inevitable corruption? Or is there an alternative way forward?