chapter  10
TEACHERS’ ATTITUDES TOWARD BULLYING
ByMELISSA HOLT, MELISSA KEYES, BRIAN KOENIG
Pages 13

Optimal youth development is in part a function of the multiple contexts in which youth are embedded, from their families to communities to schools (Bronfenbrenner, 1979; Cowen, 1991; Espelage & Swearer, 2010). Th ese environments can off er opportunities for growth or can pose threats to positive youth development, and their infl uences operate in conjunction with each individual’s characteristics. Schools represent a key environment, as they are a place where children and adolescents spend a signifi cant amount of time (Duncan & Raudenbush, 1999). Researchers have recognized the crucial role of school characteristics relative to bullying rates, and have conducted studies linking broad attributes such as school size (Bowes et al., 2009), teacher-student ratios (Bradshaw, Sawyer, & O’Brennan, 2009), and school climate to bullying perpetration and victimization. More specifi cally, teachers themselves can exert substantial infl uence over youth development, helping to shape not only their academic growth but also their social skills.