chapter  31
PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE
ByALFRED NORDMANN
Pages 12

Handbooks and companions are literary genres of their own and usually pretend to provide a review of theory or a survey of a field of inquiry. One should expect, therefore, that a community of scholars has taken an interest in the relation of philosophy of science to literature, or at least in the contributions by philosophers of science to an understanding of the relation of literature and science. Interestingly, this is not the case. The present chapter thus takes poetic license to imagine a field of inquiry that is not entirely unpopulated but wide open and that offers room for various kinds of inquiry. Rather than collect together isolated contributions to this field of inquiry, it picks some of them in a rather eclectic manner and only to hint at further work that could be done along these lines. And instead of giving a complete account of the sparse activities in the open field, it issues an invitation for others to enter, and it does this by highlighting some of the more general research projects that might be pursued there.