chapter  7
20 Pages

WHAT ENDURES? PUBLIC GOVERNANCE AND THE CYCLE OF REFORM

ByLAURENCE E. LYNN, JR

In the field of public administration and management, something is always new. In America, proclaiming “the new” has long been popular among academics. John Gaus announced the “new administration” in the early 1920s; Leonard White celebrated the “new management” and John Pfiffner the “new public administration” in the 1930s. Participants in a historic conference at Minnowbrook unveiled a new “new public administration” in the 1970s. And the habit has spread to Europe. A “new public management” was famously identified by Christopher Hood in the early 1990s and a “new city management” was born in the Netherlands.