chapter  2
The Supervisory Relationship
ByRACHEL E. CROOK LYON and KIRTI A. POTKAR
Pages 38

We have chosen to use Bordin’s (1983) conceptualization of the supervisory working alliance as foundational to our denition of the supervisory relationship. Numerous theorists and researchers assert that an understanding of the supervisory working alliance is fundamental to the process of supervision (Ladany & Inman, in press; Patton & Kivlighan, 1997; Ramos-Sanchez et al., 2002; Wood, 2005). e supervisory working alliance is dened as an association for change that involves three elements: (1) mutual agreement and understanding between the supervisor and supervisee on the goals of supervision; (2) mutual agreement and understanding of the tasks of each partner to accomplish those goals; and (3) the emotional bonds between the supervisor and supervisee necessary to sustain the endeavor (Bordin, 1983). A unique facet of the supervisory working alliance is the notion of mutuality or mutual connections between supervisors and supervisees. In other words, instead of a unidirectional concept of trust within the supervisory relationship, for example, the supervisor trusts the trainee, the supervisor perceives that mutual trust exists with the trainee (Ladany, Walker, & Melinco, 2001).