chapter  7
Purikura as a Social Management Tool
ByDAISUKE OKABE, MIZUKO ITO, AICO SHIMIZU, JAN CHIPCHASE
Pages 18

Since the late nineties, Print Club, or purikura, sticker photos taken at photo booths have been widely established among Japanese female high school students as a means of visual archiving and communication. According to Okada, the fi rst purikura booth appeared in July 1995, and by October 1997 there were 45,000 units nationwide.1 Purikura stickers are taken and modifi ed with graffi ti in purikura booths, then printed out on the spot. The fi nal purikura sticker sheet is cut into separate stickers, which are then stored in a special notebook for this purpose, called the puri-cho. Leftover stickers are stored in a container, a puri-kan, for trading with friends at a later time. If rare or highly valued, stickers are placed on mobile phones, pencil cases, and pocket mirrors.