chapter  17
Myths and Realities of Pharmacotherapy in the Military
WithSHARON MORGILLO FREEMAN, LESLIE LUNDT, EDWARD J. SWANTON, and BRET A. MOORE
Pages 18

It is important to evaluate for the presence of current medications that may be confounding the psychiatric presentation. Oen the individual may have tried to self-treat sleep disorders, the common cold, an annoying cough, or a host of other ailments. It is also possible that the individual may have developed an addiction to over-the-counter medications or is actively using or abusing or is dependent on common substances of abuse. A relatively recent issue for service members is the use of muscle-building and fat-burning supplements. In the deployed environment, it is not uncommon for service members to present to a mental health provider complaining of a recent development or exacerbation of anxiety, insomnia, agitation, or even paranoia aer beginning a self-prescribed supplement regimen. Table 17.1 lists common over-the-counter medications and their eects when used in excess, as well as behavioral manifestations of chronic use or overuse.