chapter  11
The Destructive Potential of Electronic Communication Technologies in Organizations
WithANDREW J. FLANAGIN, KATY PEARCE, AND BEVERLY A. BONDAD-BROWN
Pages 23

In spite of some controversy about net effects (Brynjolfsson, 1993), electronic communication and information technologies (ECITs) provide organizations and their members with tremendous benefits. Compared to more traditional means, contemporary technologies can carry more information, faster, at a lower cost, to more people, while also offering enhanced information search, processing, and recombinant capabilities (Beniger, 1996; Fulk & DeSanctis, 1995). Furthermore, the use of advanced electronic technologies in organizations is widespread and commonplace due to the development of a dependable technical infrastructure, decreasing technology costs, and in many cases, the achievement of a critical mass of users where relevant (Gurbaxani, 1990; Markus, 1990). Indeed, contemporary technologies can be major factors in achieving substantial organizational benefits, across interpersonal (e.g., Compton, White, & DeWine, 1991; Walther, 1995), group (e.g., DeSanctis & Poole, 1997; Lipnack & Stamps, 1997), and organizational outcomes (e.g., Davidow & Malone, 1992; Nohria & Berkley, 1994).