chapter
3 Pages

ofthe

thought about potent ofpain:

Anyone with disabilities could easily relate stories like Elshout's tale of clerical abuse. My own situation is one of intermittent difficulties; good days can be very good and bad days can send me to an emergency room. I do not always look visibly different, and this carries its own set ofproblems, that of invisible disabilities. "You look fine," said an airline steward as I attempted to preboard a flight, having forgotten my cane. "So does Magic Johnson," I replied, "but that doesn't mean much, does it?" In a world that measures by externals, meting out what little care may be found on the basis of who looks the worst, persons with invisible disabilities wage a constant fight to be acknowledged as less than they appear to be-an ironic war in which to be a tired and desperate foot soldier.