chapter  15
22 Pages

Job Stress and Gender: A Comparison of Goernment and Corporate Employees

ByLisa Fiksenbaum, Esther R. Greenglass

JOB STRESS AND GENDER: A COMPARISON OF GOVERNMENT AND CORPORATE EMPLOYEES

During the last quarter century, an extraordinary amount of research on the topic of stress has been conducted across a wide spectrum of disciplines (e.g., psychology, sociology, public health, epidemiology, management, and engineering). Vingerhoets and Marcelissen (1988) identified nearly 10,000 stress-related articles that were published between 1976 and 1985, and this research has continued to accelerate. Yet, remarkably, researchers investigating the effects of stress on health and behavior have not reached a consensus on the conceptual meaning of stress, much less formulated prescriptions for attenuating its deleterious effects. It is quite clear, however, that stress is, indeed, a very broad concept that encompasses a conglomerate of variables relating to both stressors and strains. The essential components of the stress

process include the environmental stimuli that impinge on a person and the emotional reactions and behavioral responses that are evoked, which are often highly idiosyncratic.