chapter  18
10 Pages

PERIPHERAL CIRCULATORY DISORDERS

ByJOHN M. SAXTON, NIGEL T. CABLE

Impaired functioning of the vascular endothelium and decreased peripheral vasodilatory capacity are observed in many age-related cardiovascular conditions, including hypertension (Panza et al., 1990), coronary artery disease (Thanyasiri et al., 2005), congestive heart failure (Zelis et al., 1968) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD) (Sanada et al., 2005), as well as in individuals with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (Creager et al., 1990; Celermajer et al., 1994; Al Suwaidi et al., 2001). In the United Kingdom, the number of people aged 65 and over is expected to increase at 10 times the overall rate of population growth in the next 40 years (Dean, 2003), which means that the prevalence of age-related cardiovascular disorders and their sequelae can be expected to increase. Techniques which can detect impairment of peripheral blood flow, and monitor the progression of impairment in disease states or underpinning mechanisms of symptomatic improvement following interventions in patient groups or ‘at-risk’ populations, are useful tools for exercise scientists working in health-related areas or clinical settings.