chapter  14
22 Pages

Deposition-Precipitation Synthesis of Supported Metal Catalysts

WithCatherine Louis

Deposition-Precipitation ............................................................. 326 14.4 Recent Studies Using Deposition-Precipitation by Direct Addition

of a Base .................................................................................................... 329 14.4.1 Preparation of Ni/Silicious Support ........................................... 329 14.4.2 Preparation of Supported Noble Metals..................................... 330

14.5 Recent Studies Using Deposition-Precipitation with Urea....................... 332 14.5.1 Preparation of Catalysts Supported on Carbon Nanofibers....... 332

14.5.1.1 Ni/CNF ...................................................................... 332 14.5.1.2 Pt/CNF ....................................................................... 332

14.5.2 Preparation of Supported Gold Catalysts................................... 333 14.5.3 Miscellaneous ............................................................................. 335

14.5.3.1 Preparation of Ni/H-Beta Zeolite.............................. 335 14.5.4 Preparation of Y2O3-Eu3+/Silica ................................................. 335

14.6 Deposition-Precipitation by Sonolysis ...................................................... 335 14.7 Deposition-Precipitation by Ammonia Evaporation ................................. 336 14.8 Conclusion ................................................................................................. 338 Acknowledgment ................................................................................................... 338 References.............................................................................................................. 338

The method of deposition-precipitation has been known for a long time in the industry (Table 14.1), but it has been more recently extensively studied from a

fundamental point of view to understand the underlying chemical phenomena, mainly by Geus and colleagues (1-3), then by Burattin and colleagues (4-7). Several reviews were published on this preparation method (8, 9). The purpose of this new review is to summarize what has been published since the publication of the last one in 1997 (9). We will see that sonication (Section 14.5) and evaporation of ammine (Section 14.6) can be considered as other alternatives to the deposition-precipitation. In contrast, deposition-precipitation at a fixed pH (Section 14.3.b) can be considered as a distortion of the pristine principle of deposition-precipitation.