chapter  6
10 Pages

Prebiotics and the Absorption of Minerals: A Review of Experimental and Human Data

ByKeli M. Hawthorne, Steven A. Abrams

CONTENTS Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Animal Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Human Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106

Males . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Postmenopausal Women . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106

Adolescents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Longitudinal Study of Calcium Absorption and Bone Mineralization

in Adolescents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Analytic and Statistical Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Discussion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112

Dietary factors, including calcium and vitamin D intake, absorption, and status, lifestyle factors including physical activity, and genetics interact to determine peak bone mass. The current recommended dietary intake of calcium (adequate intake, AI) of 1300mg/day in the United States for adolescents is designed to come close to allowing for maximal calcium absorption and retention [1]. However, this intake is not achieved bymost young adolescents in the United States [2]. In addition to dietary intake, another key determinant of calcium retention is intestinal absorption. Therefore, consideration of other factors such as the role of prebiotics in mineral absorption, and thus total bone mineral mass accumulation, is important. Recent animal and human studies have demonstrated that prebiotics, such as inulin-type fructans (ITF), added to the daily diet can significantly increase calcium and

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magnesium absorption. Until recently, data in humans have been relatively scarce with a single study on healthy males [3], followed by more convincing evidence in postmenopausal women [4] and adolescents [5-7].