chapter  3
30 Pages

Prebiotics: Concept, Definition, Criteria, Methodologies, and Products

ByMarcel B. Roberfroid

CONTENTS Concept, Definition, and Criteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Testing Methodologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

Resistance to Digestive Processes in the Upper Part of the GI Tract 42 In VitroMethods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 In VivoModels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

Fermentation: Testing for Prebiotic Fermentation by Intestinal Microbiota . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 In VitroMethods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 In VivoMethods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

Selective Stimulation of Growth of Intestinal Bacteria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Identification of Changes in Composition of the Microbiota . . . . . . . . 44

Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Polymerase Chain Reaction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Direct Community Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Denaturing/Temperature Gradient Gel Electrophoresis

(DGGE or TGGE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Review of Candidate Prebiotics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Inulin-Type Fructans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Chemistry, Nomenclature, and Manufacture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Inulin-Type Fructans and Criteria for Classification as Prebiotic . . . 48 Transgalactooligosaccharides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

Chemistry and Manufacture of Transgalactooligosaccharides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

Lactulose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Chemistry and Manufacture of Lactulose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

Isomaltooligosaccharides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Chemistry and Manufacture of Isomaltooligosaccharides . . 53

Lactosucrose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Chemistry and Manufacture of Lactosucrose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

8171: “chap03” — 2007/12/3 — 14:26 — page 40 — #2

of

Xylooligosaccharides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Chemistry and Manufacture of Xylooligosaccharides . . . . . . . 54

Soybean Oligosaccharides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Chemistry and Manufacture of Soybean

Oligosaccharides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Glucooligosaccharides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

Chemistry and Manufacture of Glucooligosaccharides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

Miscellaneous Carbohydrates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Prebiotic Responses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Future Perspectives and Conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60

In 1995, Gibson and Roberfroid defined a prebiotic as a “nondigestible food ingredient that beneficially affects the host by selectively stimulating the growth and/or activity of one or a limitednumber of bacteria in the colon, and thus improves host health.” This definition only considers microbial changes in the human colonic ecosystem. Later, itwas considered timely to extrapolate this into other areas that may benefit from a selective targeting of particular microorganisms and to propose a refined definition of a prebiotic as (Gibson et al. 2004):

a selectively fermented ingredient that allows specific changes, both in the composition and/or activity in the gastrointestinalmicroflora that confers benefits.