chapter  10
18 Pages

Alzheimer’s Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

ByJohn C. Morris

Alois Alzheimer reported a “peculiar” dementia in a 51-year-old woman at the meeting of South-

West Germany Psychiatrists in Tu¨binge´n on November 3 and 4, 1906. Alzheimer’s seminal

contribution was to correlate the cognitive and behavioral features of the disorder with the

histopathological findings of “miliary foci” and neurofibrillary change in the cerebral cortex

following the woman’s death at age 55 years (1). On the 100th anniversary of Alzheimer’s report

of the disease that now bears his name, it is appropriate to review the approach to the diagnosis of

Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia in older adults.