chapter  17
Husserl’s scientifi c context, 1917–1938 : A look into Husserl’s private library
ByMIRJA HARTIMO
Pages 21

Abstract: Husserl had in his library an encompassing collection of publications from all scientific disciplines. This chapter lists all the items, books or articles, that were published in various scientific disciplines between 1917 and 1938 and can be found in Husserl’s library. The items with Husserl’s reading marks are listed separately. The purpose of the list is to offer a quick overview of what we can assume Husserl knew about his scientific context during the last years of his life. The markings show that Husserl was interested in various human sciences and biology but also engaged in rather detailed studies of the latest developments in exact sciences as late as after 1936 and 1937. Keywords: Husserl, mathematics, physics, biology, psychology, social sciences, history

This chapter lists the items published in various scientific disciplines between 1917 and 1938 that were found in Husserl’s private library, housed by Husserl Archives, Leuven. The purpose of the list is to offer scholars a quick overview of what we can assume Husserl knew about the development within the various scientific disciplines during the last years of his life. The list is already as such rather long; thus, I will not engage in deeper analyses about the significance of individual items in it. I will list the items according to the discipline they belong to as follows: (1) Mathematics, (2) Physics, (3) Biology and chemistry, (4) Psychology, (5) Social sciences, economics, and anthropology, (6) Linguistics, (7) History, (8) Others. I will not list the items that belong to philosophy or philosophy of science in order to focus on acquiring a picture of what Husserl could have known about the work carried out within the scientific disciplines, excluding philosophy. Many times the borderlines are vague, which should be taken into consideration when reading and using the list. I have also omitted items written in languages that Husserl presumably did not understand. These include Polish, Japanese and Italian.