chapter
and values the National Curriculum
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In our 1991 paper A National Curriculum for All, Philip O'Hear and I set out an alternative structure which avoided these weaknesses.

There is no particular virtue in a national curriculum as such: everything depends on what kind it is. A national curriculum can be used as a means of repression or indoctrination, as happened under Hitler and Stalin .... Philip and I begin from the central aim of preparing students to become citizens of a liberal democratic society. We do not interpret this narrowly, as learning about voting and other such political matters. These come into the picture, but more basic than them is the aim of passing on the core values of our kind of polity. Central among these is the value of self-determination. We all rightly take it as read that individuals should be freed, as far as practicable, from constraints of poverty, drudgery, ignorance, domination and fear which might hold them back from choosing a worthwhile life of their own. Balancing this, since we are not in the business of producing a nation of autonomous egoists, is an array of values to do with what binds us to other people - from more intimate values like friendship, through shared activities and attachments to local and national groupings, to more impersonal demands of benevolence, justice, respect for others' rights, and a concern for humanity in general. ...