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if I may shop-but of fundamentals.

And the sociologist adds that these forms "constitute the true domain of social morphology". Here we have something precise. There remain other social groups which have no special reserved domain, no territory of their own or definite boundary. The human beings who form them live on a soil, in a country, under a sky, common to all and the same for all. Resting on a terrestrial soil, in a certain way they share in it: they bear the mark of it, Durkheim says; but their group, as a group, has no form graphically representable. There is no piece of land which is properly the "territory of the group".