chapter  Chapter 2
12 Pages

Divining Differences

Irigaray and Religion
WithEllen T. Armour

The logic of sameness that encloses Irigaray’s woman divine and the women she would divinise too closely binds them to the ‘good old God’ and the men he divinises. Taking air as a sensible transcendental as one means of refiguring the religious offers an alternative to the logic of traditional theism that ‘Divine Women’ seems to repeat. Commentators see the sensible transcendental as a counterpart to the idea of divinising women, as another ideal-yet-to-be-imagined that women can project for the sake of their own becoming and as a support for genuine relationships. Irigaray deploys this term in the service of the concerns that the myths and fables mentioned in ‘Divine Women’ bring to mind. The logic of sameness that encloses Irigaray’s woman divine and the women she would divinise too closely binds them to the ‘good old God’ and the men he divinises.