chapter  2
22 Pages

Dual Citizenship as a Challenge to Sovereignty

ByNathan Glazer

Sovereignty, by its nature, is not the kind of thing that is ordinarily thought of as capable of being divided or shared. Americans have generally understood naturalization as a complete renunciation of past loyalty, nationality, and citizenship. Americans have generally understood naturalization as a complete renunciation of past loyalty, nationality, and citizenship. Authors have two developing streams of thought in regard to dual citizenship, nationality, and loyalty. One accepts it, even to a degree celebrates it. The other, based on more traditional ideas, questions the spread and acceptance of multiple loyalties and dual citizenship. The dispute between these two points of view has been spurred by recent constitutional changes in Mexico which may have large effects on Mexican-origin citizens in the United States. Dual citizenship challenges that expectation, as does the rise of multiculturalism, and the increasing celebration of diversity.