chapter  9
11 Pages

Longitudinal study of procrastination, performance, stress, and health

The costs and benefits of dawdling
WithDianne M. Tice, Roy F. Baumeister

Procrastination is variously described as harmful, innocuous, or even beneficial. Two longitudinal studies examined procrastination among students. Procrastinators reported lower stress and less illness than nonprocrastinators early in the semester, but they reported higher stress and more illness late in the term, and overall they were sicker. Procrastinators also received lower grades on all assignments. Procrastination thus appears to be a self-defeating behavior pattern marked by short-term benefits and long-term costs.