chapter
6 Pages

of Sanya' s social structure reveals the day laborer trapped in a of cash which force men to drift from one inn to another; the infiltration of the

vicious cycle of economic relationships, while social prejudice bears down with equal force from outside. Caught between the two, the alienation of the day- laborer is an extreme within Japanese society. "After you live here for awhile," says Nakamori Kishin, a pastor in the ghetto for 20 years, "you realize there is absolutely no basis for community in Sanya. I can think of only two things that small subcontracting fmns offer day laborers none of the fringe benefits and bonuses which beef up the income of ordinary salaried workers. Most damaging to the day-laborer is the failure to guarantee steady work. Completely at the mercy of supply and demand fluctuations, no day laborer is in a position to find employment on every working day of the month. On a typical day at the Sanya

A dissection of Sanya' s social structure reveals the day laborer trapped in a vicious cycle of economic relationships, while social prejudice bears down with equal force from outside. Caught between the two, the alienation of the daylaborer is an extreme within Japanese society. "After you live here for awhile," says Nakamori Kishin, a pastor in the ghetto for 20 years, "you realize there is absolutely no basis for community in Sanya. I can think of only two things that really bring these men together: the drinking stand and the park bench." According to Nakamori's observation, the competition of the yoseba, unsteady supplies of cash which force men to drift from one inn to another; the infiltration of the doya by plainclothes men hunting for fugitive criminals, all debilitate potential bonds of unity between the men. Sexual alienation reinforces their isolation. Mistrust and contempt on the part of "ordinary society" make it extremely difficult for men in Sanya to marry. At present only 200 men, about 1.5 percent of the population, have wives.